The Babalon Difference

Babalon is different than most other goddesses in that She is exclusively a representation of the active divine feminine principle.

As the Jungian analyst Nancy Qualls-Corbett notes in her book, The Sacred Prostitute: Eternal Aspect of the Feminine, there is both a static and an active part of the divine feminine. The static archetype is the maternal aspect: in Qualls-Corbett’s words, the “unchanging and stable factor that fosters feelings of security, protection, and acceptance.”

That is to say, the Mother archetype never changes. She’s The Empress in the tarot: you’ll always be her baby. She’ll always love, accept, and defend you. The Mother’s role is to endlessly incubate and birth, nurture and protect. To live entirely for her children.

The other side of the divine feminine archetype is the active or transformative aspect. Qualls-Corbett elaborates by quoting from another prominent Jungian analyst, Ann Belford Ulanov:

“This active side of the feminine… invokes primeval forces that take us out of the limitations and conventions of social norms and the reasonable life…. Ecstasy may range from a momentary being taken out of oneself to a profound enlargement of personality.”

This is the side of the divine feminine that Babalon, a.k.a. the Sacred Whore archetype, a.k.a. the tarot’s Lust, belongs to.

What does the active, transformational side of the divine feminine feel like?

  • New Relationship Energy (NRE), the excitement we experience at the beginning of a new romantic relationship.
  • Blissful, deep, gratifying sexual connection with oneself or another
  • Creative energy, coupled with motivation to bring one’s vision to life
  • A renewed sense of potential and possibility, and the willingness to explore those to see where they lead
  • A willingness to take an active role in things that the maternal divine feminine is not usually concerned with, such as external relationships, worldly activities, and personal gratification.

In other words, worshipping the Holy Whore Babalon changes us, because we are attuning with the transformational side of the feminine, the Sacred Whore archetype. When I speak of the personal transformation I help my clients achieve, it is in the spirit of this feminine lifeforce energy, this whole-unto-herself goddess of love and war we call Babalon.

The Sacred Whore uses her own magnetic, creative potential and sacral energy intentionally, to help others awaken to that same energy and potential inherent in themselves. As such, she is much more firmly in control of her own body and magick than a strictly maternal feminine archetype that is passively impregnated and forms, births, and nurtures progeny.

And unlike the Mother, the Whore is a participant in the worldly marketplace, selling access to their time, energy, mind, and body, which are valuable because these assets have been specifically calibrated to help their clients transform in some way, via direct experience of sacred sacral energy.

So when someone hurls the word whore at another person as a misogynist epithet, what are they really criticizing?

  • They are criticizing that person’s personal power and self-determination, especially as it relates to their work, their money, and their sex life.
  • They are criticizing the person for being in touch with their magnetic, creative potential.
  • They are criticizing that person for playing an active, rather than passive, role.
  • They are criticizing that person’s willingness to share all of themselves—even the personal, intimate aspects—with others.
  • And they are accusing that person of debasing themselves, vis-à-vis a very specific masculine, monotheistic worldview that emphasizes woman’s place as
    • in the home,
    • raising children, and
    • providing sexual access to one person,
      • purely for the means to reproduce.

As a self-possessed, female-identifying entrepreneur who does not share that masculine, monotheistic worldview, I don’t see those first four as negative things, and I wholeheartedly reject the last. I would wager that most of my peers would feel likewise.

At the same time, I recognize (and celebrate) that my very presence in the marketplace is a challenge to millennia of the so-called ‘status quo.’ I also understand that any time I portray myself as a sexual being with a will of her own, I invoke the Whore archetype, especially if I’m willing to inhabit my sexuality at the same time as I’m selling absolutely anything at all. And yet, I am inspired by my own potential, my own creative power, and my own gifts and talents that I share with the world.

Does that make me a whore?

Well, aren’t we all selling our time, energy, mind, and/or body—to someone, be they employer, client, or customer—for our livelihoods?

Whores. Aren’t we all?

And if so, why not stand in that power—own it, use it, and celebrate our independence, our self-determination, and our potential?

Why not completely remove the negative, shaming power of that word as an epithet, and instead channel our active feminine archetype deliberately, to help bring about an age of independent, empowered, self-possessed people that are creating a thriving world for all of us to live in?

In my mind’s eye, I see a world in which all people recognize the divine spark within all others, and in which we all contribute our unique talents, unrestrained, with the knowledge that everyone’s contributions are absolutely vital to the whole. In my mind’s eye, I so clearly see a world in which the Sacred Whore leads the way to the self-actualization of humanity as a whole, and it’s an earth-shaking vision.

May Mystery, Babalon the Great, the Mother of Prostitutes and Abominations, bless us all with Her love, lust, and transformative magick, that we may know and experience our own divine sparks, for the good of all humanity.

In Nomine Babalon!

The Lusty Mage Reviews… F*ck Like a Goddess: Heal Yourself. Reclaim Your Voice. Stand in Your Power. by Alexandra Roxo

Right after I shared my last blog post, a dear friend sent me an email with the link to Alexandra Roxo’s newest offering. Book nerd and incorrigible book collector that I am, I promptly ordered and devoured it in less than twenty-four hours.

After gorging myself on the juiciness of the first pass-through, I’ve immediately started right back in on working through all the exercises in earnest…

 

 

So, let me start with this: if you are interested in practicing sex magick, reigniting your sex life, or effectuating rapid personal transformation, but don’t know where to start, F*ck Like a Goddess: Heal Yourself. Reclaim Your Voice. Stand in Your Power. is the guide to sexual and personal alchemy that will become fundamental to your work.*

This is real, deep-shadow work, packaged in an empowering, compassionate, and easy to follow format. The exercises are easily executed, and although they appear deceptively simple, they pack a wallop! Before I could even complete the first one, I’d already had some pretty astounding realizations about my own path to transformation, and shed a few tears of deep truth, too.

Roxo meets us where we are on the path to reclaiming our sexuality, wherever that may be. The book is well-researched, nonjudgmental, and reflects a wide range of magickal experience. With a personal story that is deeply resonant to me and I’m guessing many other women too, Roxo invites us into the sacred temple of sacred sexuality, wraps her arms around us, and whispers, welcome home, sister. In short, it’s a book I’ll happily admit that I wish I had written, but I’m so grateful that she did so I, too, can be a recipient of its incredible gift.

Not only is Roxo brilliantly connected to today’s current of sexual reclamation and divine feminine celebration, but I was also thrilled to discover that she, too, had an intuitive learning relationship with the incomparable Bobby Drinnon! I couldn’t help but feel an immediate kinship with her. And although I haven’t traveled the globe or made illuminating films the way she has, I found her to be relatable and funny, and the feelings that underlie her narrative are universal.

In closing, two enthusiastic wands up! You can expect to see FLaG on my recommended reading lists and referenced in my sex witch courses to come!

 

 

*Full Disclosure: this blog post contains affiliate links, meaning that if you purchase the product through my link, I will receive a small commission on the linked item.

 

Naked Athena? Call Her by Her Real Name

Stunning photos and film clips of a female protester in Portland, Oregon are circulating on Twitter and in mainstream media the last few days. Clad in nothing but a mask and a hat, a mysterious woman single-handedly faced off a large group of armed federal law enforcement officers during a dangerous and escalating protest by displaying herself naked in the No Man’s Land that formed between the officers and protesters at the intersection of Third Avenue and Taylor Street.

Video clips of the encounter document that she showed no sign of trepidation or intimidation, and approached the line of law enforcement with grace and no small measure of seduction. Several accounts of the anonymous protester describe her assuming a number of poses during her silent confrontation with law enforcement, the range of which spanned from meditative to seductive. At one point, she sat down on the pavement, opened her legs, and unabashedly welcomed the gaze of the mostly male officers. After approximately 10 minutes of her tantalizing standoff, the officers dispersed, and she disappeared into the crowd, unharmed.

She has been hailed as “Naked Athena” by the media, and I wholeheartedly agree that her actions were nothing short of divinely inspired. But if I may be so bold, I think attributing the protester’s inspiration to Athena is paying homage to the wrong goddess.

Athena, the Greek goddess of wisdom and war, was a fierce warrior who was known for her intelligence and strategy. And though the anonymous protester was fearlessly facing an armed, hostile force while she herself was armed with only the gifts with which she was born, the media seems to be forgetting (if they ever knew) that Athena was first and foremost a Daddy’s Girl. Athena was known to be a defender of Her father, Zeus, and His rule, excellent at debate and strategy, and downright terrifying on the battlefield. In short, Athena is the Princess of Swords.

And though it’s deliciously tempting to compare this protester to mighty and terrifying Athena, I must point out that Athena would’ve been leading the line of law enforcement, defending the patriarchy and Her father’s rule.

However.

There was a goddess present in the street that night, clad in the flesh and blood of a mortal woman brazenly displaying herself on the pavement for all to see, inviting lust, worship, admiration, and fear.

There was a goddess leading the activists and their call for justice. A goddess in the form of a graceful, beautiful, and terrifying woman who is not bound by the rules, judgments, and constrictions imposed by such impermanent things as nation-states.

There was a goddess standing guard in Portland that night, leading Her people to stand up for themselves, their justice, their lives, their loves. She is something very different from Athena’s ruthless and calculating Princess of Swords. This is a goddess of fire, blood, lust, and ecstasy. Someone who looks much more like the Queen of Wands.

Her glorious name is BABALON: Our Lady the Scarlet Woman, The Mother of Abominations, the Bride of Chaos.

Babalon is the Western esoteric name for the Sumerian goddess Inanna and the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. Her role in attaining enlightenment is to receive all and deny none. All those who give themselves over completely in worship of Her are drained into Her cup of abominations—sucked dry in a fit of carnal ecstasy, if you will. It’s a metaphor for the death and rebirth of ego surrender, which every prophet, saint, and savior achieves in order to reach enlightenment. Babalon is the vehicle for return to the Light, the Source, the All. The whole of Babalon’s teachings are couched in an allegory of sexual relations, because orgasm is a tiny death—a sacred, transcendental experience that gives mere mortals a glimpse into the ineffable, infinite light of Source.

Thus, Babalon is a goddess of sacred metamorphosis, an archetype of defiantly female sexual impurity heralding transformation and evolution, emphasizing that the sacred and profane are one and the same. She is beyond beautiful—the fullness of sexual pleasure, the embodiment of divine feminine sexuality and carnal knowledge. That is her loving side.

The power which our anonymous protester marshaled and displayed in the simple act of sharing her body without condition or malice—to such a degree that a large force of angry and anxious warriors was temporarily disarmed by surprise and the sheer wonder of beauty and attraction—was nothing less than the deliverance of the Divine Feminine, of BABALON the Beautiful Herself.

For a moment, there was a retreat from the brink of deterioration, madness, and desecration; for a moment, no one was hurt. For a moment, Third Avenue was simply filled with people—each and every single one precious and divine and worthy of love.

Babalon as seen in The Thoth Tarot, holding aloft Her cup of abominations while astride the Beast of Chaos.

But, Our Lady of Abominations also has a warring side. Because She is the Bride of Chaos and the divine embodiment of transformation and evolution, Babalon is also the goddess of war, activism, empowerment, and revolution. Girt with sword, unimpeded by gods, and covered in the blood of sacrifice, this is the goddess who will see justice be done. This is no victim’s deity. She takes back what has been stolen, rights the wrongs, returns the balance.

As this long, hot summer wears on, and as the sea change in the course of American history continues, may we be inspired by Our Lady to continue the fight for righteousness and universal equity. May we find divine joy in love as well as in struggle. May we be welcomed into Her arms of Love and Her arms of Justice.

IN NOMINE BABALON